Category Archives: Parents

Sensory integration, Sensory Parenting, Parent partnerships and collaboration, home carryover, sensory diets and sensory lifestyles, parents know their child best.

Follow Your Gut, part 2.

Mums and dads know their child best! They are their child’s biggest advocate.  In a recent post I had written to ‘Follow Your Mummy Gut’ or Daddy Gut.

Sadly, in my practice I’m often told by parents that they just knew ‘something wasn’t right’ from early on however their concerns were dismissed by their doctors, health visitors or even family members. They were often told to wait and see, let him / her (child) be a kid, or they’ll grow out of it. So, what can you do as a parent if you’re in this situation?

This article offers some great suggestions to parents including:

1) Get a second opinion
2) Keep a record of behaviours via either a log, journal, photos, or even videos
3) Research – nowadays the internet is full of resources and it can at times be overwhelming, however there are some fantastic parent groups out there with other parents who are in your same shoes
4) Don’t stop, keep asking questions and get a referral for a specialist
5) I’d like to add that if you have concerns with development, behaviour, learning, social-emotional skills, sensory processing or motor milestones, have your child assessed by an Occupational Therapist experienced in these areas right away. They can assess your child’s development, let you know how it is impacting on their functional skills and start working on these areas now versus later. It’s never to early to get help.

Follow your Mommy Gut!

I recently watched Holly Robinson Peete share her family’s story about their son who has Autism. Her story sounds so much like the stories of families I work with. I loved what she had to say as it applies to families and children with all types of special needs, not just Autism.

Follow your “mommy gut!” Nobody knows your child like you do.

As health professionals and therapists, we should be listening carefully to what parents are saying as they know their child best and in effect, are telling us their child’s diagnosis. Early Intervention is key.

Check out the video:

First Signs-Early detection and intervention for Autism

I often work with parents who are concerned that their baby or child is not making eye contact, struggling to meet their motor and learning milestones, or doesn’t respond to their name.  Oftentimes, the wonder whether the child has Autism.

First Signs is a wonderful organization dedicated to educating parents and professionals about early signs of autism and the importance of Early Intervention.

They have great pages on:

  • Red Flags
  • Hallmark milestones from birth to three years
  • How to share your concerns with your doctor?
  • Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment

I love how they emphasize that paediatricians should better screen children during routine visits and the importance of partnership between parents and healthcare providers.  Parents know their child best and have a gut instinct when there is a problem.  It’s our job as healthcare providers to listen carefully to what parents are saying and make a proactive action plan. Rather than wait-and-see, let’s act early and make the most of a child’s early years when they are constantly learning and growing.  Let’s use prevention versus trying to remediate a problem later.  It’s never to early and Early Intervention is key.

Sorting Out Developmental Delay for Infants

Today I found a newsletter called A Pediatric Perspective put out by Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare in Minnesota, US. I really appreciate their articles focusing on Early Detection and Early Intervention.

This particular article written by a Neurodevelopmental Paediatrician, Dr. Raymond Tervo, M.S., reviews Red Flags for infants, toddlers, and preschool aged children that can indicate Developmental Delays in the areas of language, gross motor, fine motor, and cognitive skills.

The article can be slightly heavy but a great read for parents and definitely for health professionals. It was so nice to read what I say and believe on paper! 🙂

Here are the main points:

1)    PARENTS KNOW BEST!! If a parent is worried, chances are that something needs attention. Concerns may be in areas of speech and language, fine motor / hand skills, cognition, or difficulty reaching motor milestones.

2)    Early detection of problems is vital because brain development is very impressionable at an earlier age. Therefore, if you observe a delay, REFER on early for necessary medical treatments and therapy services. Early Intervention is crucial.

3)    Monitor infants with risk factors such as low birth weight, prematurity, brain bleeds, or known diagnoses including Down Syndrome or Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

4)    Delays in one developmental domain (e.g. language) can impair development in another area (e.g. motor skills and/or cognition).

5)    Red Flags for parents to look out for at specific ages for babies and young children.