Category Archives: Movement

Sensory Integration, Vestibular Processing, Movement and brain breaks, Motor Skills, Home and School.

Sensory Chalk Walk Obstacle Courses

Lockdown has finally given us the impetus to create some Chalk Walk Obstacle Courses for our neighbourhood.  (See video examples below.)  I’ve always wanted to make these, and now that we have started, my son loves making them too.  

People often think these chalk walks are difficult to make, however they’re so fun and you can involve your kids in making them too.  We have now made a bunch of these during the past couple of months, including for younger and older children.  

We have done very simple ones by going down our street drawing designated areas for ‘dancing,’ being ‘goofy,’  doing ‘silly walks,’ and drawing Hop Scotch grids which even the older people on our street have loved doing.  

How chalk obstacle courses develop sensory processing and motor skills: 

  • FUN while social distancing!
  • gross motor skills
  • body and spatial awareness
  • balance and coordination
  • motor planning skills to create, plan and execute 
  • fine and visual motor control 
  • organisational skills
  • emotional regulation 

TOP TIP:  Check the weather before you draw out your chalk course.  We learned the hard way as it sadly rained the day after we made ours a couple of times. 

How to create and arrange a chalk walk obstacle course, keeping your child in mind: 

  1. Start with a more intense, heavy work component such as jumping or doing press-ups
  2. Next, do a balance and / or challenge task such as walking along a wavy line or jumping and turning
  3. Have a high energy component (running on the spot for a minute, running for the home stretch)
  4. a mindful calming section (e.g. blow out the candles, sniff the flowers, sing a song, or unscramble letters to words, or say affirmations).   

Although do just have fun, follow your child’s lead and get them involved in creating these.    

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Chalk Walk Obstacle Course Examples: 

Here are several examples that my son and I have done for our neighbourhood.  Do share your ideas.  We’d love to see them. 

 

Movement Breaks and Programs while Staying At Home

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We have been Staying At Home for 5 weeks.  We know because we have stuck it through to our 6th week doing PE with Joe now.   We usually have a very active week with swimming, yoga, skateboarding, and parks.  Currently, our top two activities have been moving and crafting.  

My son is lucky to have access to OT swings since I run a clinic from home.  For others, this is a great time to explore getting either a Gorilla Gym doorway set (stays in place via strong suction) or the Rainy Day Indoor Playground (has 4 small screws to stay in place in the doorway) with swings and trapezes. 

Below are also some movement programs and videos that suit individual children. 

PE with Joe, Mon to Fri, 9-9:30, is very popular and we do this daily.  It is challenging and great for certain children …and parents. 🙂  Joe also has shorter videos for children.  

Group HIIT’s for children are great for those who need more intense sensory and movement breaks, particularly during this time where we are limited to home.  

The Kids Coach -These are really good short fitness videos developed with an Occupational Therapist

Cosmic Kids Yoga is a wonderful program where yoga is completed to familiar stories children love, such as Frozen, Minecraft or Star Wars.  She also has a wonderful Zen Den videos to support mindfulness in children, and Peace Out relaxation for kids programs.  

GoNoodle is a fantastic program I’ve recommended for years, filled with movement and brain breaks that can be searched through by school grade.  

The Little Gym UK has put out some nice children’s gymnastics videos by age ranges from infants and toddlers, to  younger and older children.  

Andy’s Wild Workouts are also lovely, slower paced, interactive, and shorter, run by Cbeebies.  These are great for younger children. 

For children who like to dance, there are many dance options right now with Zumba Kids, samba with Oti Mabuse live on Facebook everyday at 11:30, and ballet with Royal Opera House.  I have been doing Movement Warriors with my 8 year old son for the past few weeks and it has not only been great fun but really nice to be connected and doing something joyful and tricky together.  

I’d love to hear if you have found any movement games, activities, or programs you enjoy. 

 

Benefits of Yoga for Children in Occupational Therapy

Last year at this time, my husband, then 2-year old and I visited Copenhagen, Denmark for 9-days. Not a holiday. I attended Sonia Sumar’s course, Yoga for the Special Child. It was my first course after becoming a mum and first time away from my son for the entire day. He had fun with his dad, and I had fun doing yoga, meditation (well, trying) and relaxation everyday. It felt like a retreat. 🙂

Sonia Sumar is an amazing teacher with lots of personal wisdom to share. I have never taken a course that wasn’t offered by an Occupational, Physical or Speech Therapist. I had no idea I was going to learn about chanting, meditation, and lots of life lessons from Sonia versus just yoga (body) exercises. It has been as good for me as it has for my son and kids I work with.

A year later, I regularly do my own yoga routine learned in the course and have felt stronger, healthier and more energetic overall. The kids and my 3-year old love it too.

There are so many benefits to yoga but some of them are:

-calming and grounding

-chanting helps with calming, joint attention and engagement, auditory processing

-breathing alongside movements encourages children to breathe while moving (many children who are weak tend to hold their breath while doing motor tasks as they are using their diaphragm, a breathing muscle, to hold their body versus to breathe)

– builds an emotional connection between yogi and student

-yoga poses build core strength, body and spatial awareness, balance and motor planning skills

-yoga flow – a sequence of yoga poses that connect from one to another – build rhythm and timing, fluidity of movements and sequencing skills

-incorporates of breath and movement of eyes whilst doing the yoga poses

-kids learn how to calm and find a ‘quiet space’

-deep relaxation – it’s amazing how many of us can’t still our bodies or minds to relax. I’m still working on this myself and it’s a tough one.

For more information, check out:

Yoga for the special child

For those who are in or near London, check out the work of MahaDevi Yoga Centre

You can also learn more from the Yoga for the Special Child Book

Om Shanti Shanti. (Peace peace peace)

 

Sensory Swings Pre-Made Part 3/3

 
 
 
**Disclaimer:  The following are just ideas and must be used at your own discretion for safety.  Please be sure to use appropriate soft padding, measure for size in your space, and most importantly, provide supervision for your child’s safety.
 
I’d love to have more DIY skills or even a little workshop to build toys and equipment. But alas, I often resort to Amazon!
 
I’ll share some swings, trapezes and other equipment I’ve purchased from Amazon or local shops that kids really like.
 
Firstly, I’ve bought carabiner hooks and rope from a local outdoors climbing shop.  Make sure the carabiners will hold the amount of weight for your child to safely swing.  When looking for rope, consider whether your child will do better with static rope which has no give and will be less unpredictable, or dynamic rope which has some stretch and bounce to it.
 
 
If your child responds to spinning input, a rotary spinner can be found on Amazon.  This is what I use at ot4kids’ clinic:
 
I have also used aerial yoga ‘daisy chains‘ to help adjust the swings either higher or lower if kids need their feet to be close to the ground.
 
Here are some ideas of swings and trapezes from Amazon:
Please note I have included affiliate links below so do receive a little £, however all proceeds go to charity.
 
For hanging and climbing:
Twizzler – this is a fun one that also spins
 
Trapeze with gymnastic rings for hanging by arms and also hanging upside down.
 
Crow nest swing seat – add pillows and blankets here for nice calming deep pressure input.  It appears very similar to the IKEA Ekorre Swing.
 
Hammock swing – There are many different varieties and although I often suggest to parents to go to the fabric shop and feel the material and how stretchy it is (if your child likes bounce, a stretchy one may be great, if they need a calming space, a less stretchy lycra one may be more suitable). I have both a lycra hammock and a Yogapeutics hammock which has no-give for different situations.
 
Flexible Swing Seat – Try this one from different positions such as laying on tummy or sitting forwards or even sideways
 
 
Tire swing – for sitting or standing
 
Nest Platform Swing – This swing looks like it could be used from different positions similar to a platform swing, albeit, not the same. Perhaps a more economical option if you struggle with DIY like myself.
 
 
 

Homemade Sensory Integration Swings – Part 2 / 3

 
 
**Disclaimer:  The following are just ideas and must be used at your own discretion for safety.  Please be sure to use appropriate soft padding, measure for size in your space, and most importantly, provide supervision for your child’s safety.
 
 
This time I thought I’d share more on how to make some swings.
 
In my clinic, I mostly use my homemade platform and hammock swings.  Personally, I love the hammock swing after a long day and my toddler would love to nap in it.  I wish I were a bit more handy and could actually sew, I’d create a lot more.
 
Here are some ideas to guide you to make homemade swings:
 
1) Platform Swing –
 
If you’re into DIY, you could make this. Here are a few alternative ways others have made their platform swings.
 
 
 
 
2) A Hammock Swing
 
This one is so easy to make and requires no sewing or tools.
For mine I bought 4 yards of Lycra material from Fabrics Galore on Lavendar Hill in London.  I tied a knot on both ends through a ring and then attached it to my swing ropes. Here are some other more detailed guides.
 
 
 
I’d love this one!
 
3) Inner Tube Swing
I don’t have one but kids I previously treated loved playing bumper cars with these at my first job in California.
 
 
 
4)  Taco Swing
This is on my wish list along with a homemade bolster swing. It looks relatively easy to make if only I could sew.
 
 
Next blog post, I’ll share some of the swings easily available locally.
 

Installing Sensory Integration Swings – Part 1/ 3

 

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**Please note all ideas shared in this blog post are to be done at your own risk or discretion. It’s recommended to have an engineer or contractor assess your ceiling structure to determine whether it is safe and sturdy.

During OT sessions, parents often want ideas they can replicate at home, especially activities their kids really enjoy.  Swinging often falls in this category.
 
Part of classical sensory integration therapy includes using suspended equipment and therapeutic swings. Although there are lots of other effective and fun ways for children to get movement input without swings, swings are an option for the home.
 
The following are some ideas of how to install a swing for your child at home:
 
1) CEILING
 
Here is a great resource explaining different ceiling hooks. This is where an engineer or contractor will help.
 
 
Nice step by step directions from the DIY Network:
 
 
This blog post is written by a parent describing the process:
 
 
 
 
2) DOORWAY
 
This is a good alternative if you can’t access a ceiling for swings, especially if you happen to have a double doorway. 🙂  Prior to my current clinic space, I used the Rainy Indoor Playground Support Bar, however now am fortunate to have a larger area.
 
See how these two parents have used their doorway for swings:
 
 
 
I can personally recommend the Rainy Indoor Playground Support Bar. It’s so easy to install and if you move or rent homes, the holes from the screws can very easily be patched up.  For those in the UK, it can be purchased from Sensory Direct here:
 
 
Many parents have also installed a pull-up bar in their doorway from which they’ve attached a swing or trapeze.
 
 
 
For those in the US, there’s an Indoor Gym which I haven’t tried but looks interesting.
 
 
 
3) LOFT BED 
 
I’d love to do this when my son is ready to sleep in a loft bed.
 
 
 
 
4) A STRONG TREE!
 
My neighbors are so lucky to have a great tree from which they’ve hung a cool IKEA swing for their kids. If you do too, consider attaching swings there.
 
Here’s a tree swing kit on Amazon.
 
 
For all of the above ideas, be sure to put down an old mattress, crash pad or gym mat under and around the swing for safety.
 
Happy Swinging! 🙂
 
Munira

Therapeutic Benefits of Babywearing

 

I’ve an 8-month old baby with sensory processing difficulties and who has had a bit of a rough start from a traumatic birth.  Babywearing has been a huge part of our lives as he struggles to tolerate any seating devices especially strollers and car seats.  We started with a ring sling when he was home from the hospital, then a hop tei (a modified mei tai Asian carrier), and now as he is older, we also use a more supportive Ergo carrier. It’s our favourite therapeutic, ahem “fun, ” activity. 🙂

 

I have found many therapeutic benefits to babywearing and often recommend it to parents for these reasons:

 

SENSORY:

 

1) Deep pressure input, warmth, and comforting smell of parent are calming and organizing. This is particularly helpful for babies who are sensitive to touch, movement, or sounds, who have had long NICU / SCBU stays, or who need support settling into the big, outside world.
2) Boundaries of the carrier give body input and awareness for comfort and motor skills development such as babies with low tone, sensory motor difficulties, or prematurity.
3) Vestibular / movement input – the gentle bouncing, rocking and swaying motions provide movement input which is again soothing but also helps stimulate tone for balance and coordination and make sense of one’s body. The vestibular system is also strongly connected to the visual, auditory, and emotional centres of the brain. Movement helps kids focus, learn, and coordinate both sides of their bodies.
4) Powerful way to bond after a traumatic birth and from personal experience, so fun to interact with baby wherever you go.
You can see how it can either help decrease sensory overload for sensitive babies or provide extra input to babies who need more sensory information.  By integrating, touch, body and movement input, we are helping develop multi-sensory processing.
MOTOR:

 

1) Encourages flexed  positioning – oftentimes babies with traumatic births, brain bleeds, prematurity, low tone, or sensory processing disorder assume an extended posture due to tightness, arching their back or sensory overload.  Heathy, full-term babies are in a flexed curled-up position from the womb. Extension is a red flag. Slings and carriers can be used to help encourage this flexed position.  Have your occupational or physical therapist help with positioning.
2) For positioning, remember it is important to face inwards and assume a squatt position. See this article:

http://blog.ergobaby.com/2012/02/facing-inward-or-outward-the-physiological-aspects/

3) Alternative to tummy time – many babies struggle wit tummy time for varied reasons. Baby carrying can be a gentle step towards tummy time by holding your baby against you.
4) Upright positioning can be more comfortable for babies with reflux, gutt, or respiratory problems.
Resources:

 

UK Sling Libraries
Visit a sling library to try different carriers and find what suits you and your baby.

http://www.ukslinglibraries.co.uk/

Babywearing International

http://babywearinginternational.org/

Homemade Sensory Equipment

 

**Disclaimer:  All content on this website is my professional opinion and for your information only.  It is by no means a substitute for medical or individualized input from an Occupational Therapist. 

I often encourage parents to use what they have at home for sensory input activities and obstacle courses.   There are many inexpensive items that may be used.  Here are some of my favourites.  Pease obtain input from your  OT of how to use these to help your child. Supervision is necessary for safety.

 

1)  Therapy Ball for trunk exercises, ball massages, throwing and catching games, or cross pattern brain gym activities.

 

2) Sofa Cushions and Pillows can be used as stepping stones, piles to jump and crash onto, or to crawl over for babies to older children.  For example, here are some fun stepping stones made from scrap cardboard. http://wendyjanelle.blogspot.co.uk/2010/05/sensory-steps.html

 

3) Crash Pads for gross motor or sensory input, or as part of a quiet, calming space.  You can make a crash pad by filling a duvet or quilt cover with pillows, blankets or scrap pieces of foam.  Use it to relax in, do homework or read a book, crawl or roll over, walk and climb over to improve balance, or hide objects under.

 

4) Boxes have endless potential. We know babies rather play with a box than toys. 🙂 Use different sizes for climbing in and out of. Open the box flaps to become a tunnel to crawl through.  Lay on a box and use it as a sled. Prop a huge moving box against a sofa and voila, you have a slide. A tight box filled with pillows can be used as a calming spot. For little ones, fill a box with balls or other textures for a sensory bin. Boxes can be used in lots of fun ways as an addition to your sensory tables.
Sand and Water Tables Blog

http://tomsensori.blogspot.co.uk/

Pre school play link

http://pre-schoolplay.blogspot.co.uk/2012/01/sensory-table-cover.html

 

5) Mattress or an air mattress can be used to jump on, crawl over, or prop up against the bed or sofa for a slide or a mountain to climb up.

 

6) Blanket swings for smaller, lighter children.

 

7) Step ladder for climbing practice to develop strength, bilateral coordination and motor planning.

 

8) Suspended Balls – You can either tie a string to a beach ball or place a tennis ball in panty hose and then hang it for lots of fun target practice.

 

9) Tires – Save those old car tires at your next car service. They can be used to sit or stand on, walk around or to step in and out of.

 

10) Plank of Wood as a balance beam. Alternatively fold a bath towel or blanket in the shape of a balance beam or put long strips of masking tape or string on the ground to walk on.

http://movingsmartblog.blogspot.co.uk/2011/08/smart-steps-walk-line.html

 

Have a look at these 2 blog posts for lovely ideas:

http://wecandoallthings.blogspot.co.uk/2012/07/parents-guide-to-diy-therapy-equipment.html

http://www.thegoodneighborhood.com/2012/06/20/a-place-of-joy-pulling-off-a-pop-up-playground-on-buffalos-east-side/

 

For those of you with carpentry and DIY skills, here are some projects I also hope to make…..well, some day. 🙂

 

Woven Wrap Hammock Swing (All you need is a wrap and a coffee table or bunk bed)
Tire Rocker

http://barefootnparadise.blogspot.co.uk/2011/10/tire-rocker-and-see-saw.html

http://www.crumbbums.com/?p=1934

 

Balance Beam

 

Balance Board

Movement = Increased Attention and Learning

I chose to become a pediatric Occupational Therapist because I’ve always loved kids but also, I can’t sit still.  I think best when I’m moving and doodling. I think doodling is a word? 🙂 Like kids, I struggle to sit still for long, let alone sit still and learn. I love when research shows that children who get more physical activity actually do better in schools.

It certainly takes creativity and flexibility on a teachers part to cater to each students  sensory preferences and what helps them learn.  Some kids need to move, others need to fidget or doodle, and some may need to chew. This improves the child’s processing, attention, memory and overall ability to learn.
 

 

Movement Breaks for the Classroom:
-Run /jog on spot, march, spin, do jumping jacks.
-Infinity Walk
-Yoga moves in chair or while standing
-Brain gym activities
-Pass out materials or tidy up
-Use a move ‘n sit cushion
-Sit on a balance ball
-Stand at the table instead
-Lay on floor to do work

 

Here are some fun ‘Brain Breaks’ for teachers to combine movement and learning:
 
 

 

Fidgets are also helpful for processing and learning.  Teachers can provide students with rules to safely use fidgets.  Items used could be:  ponytail bands, paper clips, Velcro under the table, key chain on trouser loops, stretchy bracelets, pencil toppers, koosh balls, balloons filled with flour or rice, or simply an eraser.  Consider the child’s sensory preferences when choosing a fidget and change it for variety.  Some children need feet fidgets. My friend Ida Zelaya from Sensory Street, Inc. suggested rolling cut-up pool noodles with the feet. Perhaps even having a beanbag to use with the feet.
 
 

 

Proprioceptive input, heavy work, can be calming and organizing.  The easiest way is by running an errand or doing chores involving heavy lifting, pushing or pulling.  A popular strategy is to tie theraband to the chair legs to stretch with legs or squeezing a stress ball.
 
 

 

Here are 3 wonderful articles to share with your teacher or school:
 
 
 

 

Due to every child having their own sensory and learning preferences, it’s important to have an Occupational Therapist advise on strategies, frequency and intensity of sensory input to help under various circumstances. Ultimately, the goal is for the child to learn this for themselves. 🙂

Backpack Awareness Day 2012

Kids schlep around huge backpacks these days so its not surprising that: 

-64% students from 11-15 years report back pain
-55% students carry backpacks more than the recommended 10% of their body weight
-how you wear a backpack can negatively affect your health

 

Backpack Wearing Guidelines: 
1) Straps should be worn on both shoulders
2) backpack should weigh no more than 10% of the child’s body weight
3) place heavier items closer to the back or on bottom of bag
4) Height of backpack should be 2-inches below shoulder to waist level
5) Use padded shoulder straps, hip belt as well as a chest strap

 

Here are some Backpack Strategies for Parents and Students by the American Occupational Therapy Association
Listen to Karen Jacobs share tips on choosing and packing a backpack.
 

Seating for Children at Home and School

Infants and children must have good posture while laying down, sitting or standing so they have a good foundational base from which to move their arms and manipulate objects as well as attend and learn at school.  If a child has to concentrate on holding up their body, this will take away from their ability to grasp and manipulate objects and concentrate and learn at school.

Therefore, it is critical for babies and children to be well supported at their chairs and tables at home, daycares and schools during feeding, reading, writing and learning tasks.

If a child is unable to maintain good posture while sitting in their chairs at home or school, it’s important to consider whether these difficulties are contributed to by poor balance, body awareness, trunk and upper body strength, or sensory processing difficulties.

Here is a great article which describes how a child should be sitting in their chair, alternate sitting positions, and ideas for movement breaks.  Do share with teachers, family and friends.

Plagiocephaly-more than just a flat head?

Sadly, plagiocephaly (flat-head syndrome) is often dismissed as being just a cosmetic issue or one that babies will outgrow.  Finally, studies done at the Children’s Institute in Seattle, Washington, US, show that there may be an association between plagiocephaly and developmental delay.

In this study led by Matthew Speltz, PhD, 472 babies between 4-12 months were screened for cognitive and motor development. Half of these babies had been diagnosed with plagiocephaly from Seattle Childrens Hospital’s Craniofacial Centre and the other half were a “normal” control group.

It was discovered that babies with some degree of plagiocephaly were more likely to perform worse on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development III than the control group.

These findings indicate that there may be an association between plagiocephaly and developmental delay or that children with existing motor problems are at risk of developing flatter heads due to lack of movement.

I find that babies with plagiocephaly often have other underlying problems such as:

  • low muscle tone
  • poor strength and coordination
  • sensory processing, movement sensitivities
  • motor planning
  • organizational skills
  • poor regulation
  • …….and more

Research shows the following babies can be at-risk of developing plagiocephaly:

  • those born prematurely
  • multiple births
  • torticollis (tight neck muscles on one side)
  • developmental delay
  • certain syndromes
  • eye muscle problems.

****Babies with Plagiocephaly should be screened early on to determine whether there are possible motor, cognitive, neurological, orthopaedic, or cognitive delays. Definitely worthwhile catching a problem early!

Strokes Happen Amongst Children Too!

People often think of strokes for adults, however they occur amongst children too.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/children_shealth/7907230/The-child-victims-of-stroke.html

Approximately 5 children a week in Britain have a stroke. 2/3’s of those that survive suffer long-term disability that affects their movement. 1/3 of those that survive have no lasting impairment. Oftentimes, there’s already another pre-existing condition such as congenital heart disease.

Due to lack of public and medical awareness of childhood stroke, kids are being diagnosed too late. It is critical to have faster diagnosis and earlier treatment for a better outcome!

Some common signs that indicate strokes can be: headaches, unable to feel or move right side, floppy, and difficulty speaking.  Clumsiness and an alteration in consciousness may also be noted.

Do share with family and friends to raise awareness so others can get support and access to appropriate services faster.

HemiHelp in the UK is a great organization supporting children with hemiplegia.

Take a ‘Brain Break’ to boost Memory and Learning!

Researchers at UC Berkley and NYU have found that taking rests can improve learning by 10%!

Google Headquarters have also recognised the importance of taking a rest or nap to boost brain productivity. This is the ‘nap pod’ which blocks out light and sound. Perhaps students will learn and remember more  information if given opportunities to take a break.

Meanwhile, I wonder if catnaps on the train between patients will help boost my memory. 🙂

Down’s Syndrome Awareness Week- 15th to 21st March 2010

This week is Down’s Syndrome Awareness week. Having worked with many infants and young children with Down’s Syndrome, I have been inspired by their hard work, loving personalities, and achievements, particularly with the right support.

One of the events is the ‘Shifting Perspectives Photographic Exhibition‘ which examines the lives of people of all ages with Down’s syndrome, their connection to the photographers and the changes throughout the course of their lives. This is a free exhibition at the Oxo Tower from 17th to 28th March, 11am to 6pm.

2010 also marks the Association’s 40th Anniversary supporting individuals with Down’s Syndrome!

Check out the Down’s Syndrome Associations website for further details of this week.

Movement Activities for the Classroom

A couple of weeks ago I shared an article about how children benefit from movement breaks and physical activity in the classroom. Here is a link that shares 10 Simple Activities to Encourage Physical Activity in the Classroom.

I love these activities and really appreciate how they can be easily incorporated into a school day and include all the children.

A great article to share with teachers!

Physical Activity Helps Academics!

According to an article from the NY Times, a recent study shows that play, down time and recess are just as important to learning as academics such as reading, math, and science. The study even showed that fitness and recess can positively impact upon a child’s attention, concentration, behaviour, and……. GRADES!

As Occupational Therapists trained in Sensory Integration, we often recommend that children receive opportunities for movement breaks and physical activity during their school day to help maintain optimal attention and focus. This is also important to keep in mind for children with low muscle tone, hypermobility and decreased strength to sit upright. It’s a challenge to focus on academics when you struggle to hold up your body.

This is why many of you will see me sitting or bouncing on my therapy ball while working hard at the computer. 🙂

It’s great to see more research that proves physical activity helps academics!

Therapeutic Riding for Children with Prematurity

Many years ago, I won’t say how many, I had the chance to observe children with physical disabilities at a Therapeutic Riding program. I was amazed by all that they could do while riding a horse, so I’m a huge Therapeutic Riding fan.

I just read an interesting story from the NY Post about twin girls who were born prematurely and now, at 4 years of age, go for Therapeutic Riding in NYC.

Oftentimes, reading an article gets me thinking about ‘what else’? Being relatively new to London, this article made me wonder what Therapeutic Riding programs are available in London. I discovered that there is a Riding for the Disabled Association in the UK and they have a list of Therapeutic Riding (Equine Therapy) programs in the UK by location. I’ve seen great results with children I’ve treated in the past who’ve gone for Therapeutic Riding and wanted to share this with you.